• Liberty16

    Another angle to this is that women have played a major role in the recent protests. This could be a factor in a US decision to support them or not, because bolstering the protests could have the auxiliary goal of being good for civil rights and the empowerment of women. (Which will then, hopefully, spread to the rest of the Middle East. https://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/21/world/middleeast/bahrain-women-take-pride-in-vital-protest-role.html

    • Anonymous

      yes wouldn’t that be nice! but it appears for the moment that our strategic interest in bahrain will trump any human rights issues. The navy believes that without our base in Manama, Iran would control the Persian Gulf. I wonder….are there any politically liberal or moderate nations in the Gulf which could host a large American fleet?

  • M.A.

    As a Bahraini on the ground I have to object to the charge of apartheid. Mansoor Al Jamri is a respected man but that comment was made last year at a time of great duress and is completely unfair. Let us describe what we really have: There is discrimination in the police force and military, yes, and after last year’s protests were quelled there was a systematic anti-Shia media campaign and many arrests were made on a sectarian basis. There was also an effort in the late 2000s to alter the demographic by naturalizing large amounts of Arab Sunnis to decrease the Shia majority. Call these unfair practices what you may, but they are not apartheid.
    Also, the protest movement has been anything but dormant — they’ve kept at it for a whole year. It’s just that the international media picked the Feb 14 anniversary to send their cameras back here :) The reporting this year has generally been of far better quality and much better balanced than last year, I have to say.

    • Anonymous

      thank you for the comments and info. It is so good to hear voices speaking from inside bahrain. information is very hard to come by.

      there are not many foreign journalists in bahrain right now thanks to the gov.’s ban (one exception is the bbc’s bill law…you can watch his video piece here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17037225)

      that’s why twitter, fb, and youtube are so important. as a bahraini on the ground, can you give us some sense of what’s been going on there today? have there been more protests? how is the government responding to the unrest? do you see the country as destined for long-term deadlock?

      also, have you heard anything about John Timoney (King Hamad’s new police adviser). He’s a controversial figure in America for what his critics describe as an over-zealous approach to dealing with protestors at the republican convention in philadelphia in 2000 and at a free trade summit in miami in 2003. has he made any public appearances? have the police become less brutal since he arrived in the country?

      looking forward to hearing from you,

      Nick

    • Nick_Nehamas

      thank you for the comment and the info. It is so great to hear voices speaking from inside bahrain. information is very hard to come by.

      there are not many foreign journalists in bahrain right now thanks to the gov.’s ban (one exception is the bbc’s bill law…you can watch his video piece here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-17037225)

      that’s why twitter, fb and youtube are so important. as a bahraini on the ground, can you= give us some sense of what’s been going on there this week? have there been more protests? how is the government responding to the unrest? do you see the country as destined for long-term deadlock?

      also, have you heard anything about John Timoney (King Hamad’s new police adviser). He’s a controversial figure in America for what his critics describe as an over-zealous approach to dealing with protestors at the republican convention in philadelphia in 2000 and at a free trade summit in miami in 2003. has he made any public appearances? have the police become less violent since he arrived in the country?

      looking forward to hearing from you,

      Nick